2022 was full of broken and busted appliances

I’ve been documenting my real estate journey for over 2 years now. As I look back at my previous posts and look at my accomplishments and my failures, I’m so proud of myself and I know I couldn’t have done this without the support of my family and close friends who cheered me on and stepped in when I needed them. I’m so grateful for each and every one of them.

With that being said, being in real estate is hard.  At least, being a landlord is hard.  Things constantly need repair after a while and there is always upkeep that needs to be done.

Last year was full of repairs for me.  From, installing new AC units, water leaks under the kitchen sink, replacing washing machine parts, water heater parts, and pipes bursting in the guest bathroom. It was always something and most of these things happened in December. It seemed like I was always fixing something.

Now, I know this goes with the territory. I purposely have not splurged with the cash flow that comes from this property for this reason and I’m okay with it, but it’s definitely making me re-evaluate my real estate strategy.  I’m asking myself the questions.

  • Do I want to purchase more rental properties and deal with broken things all the time because this is not true passive income?
  • Should I focus more on tax liens and start bidding in other states again?
  • What other things can I do to increase the cash flow of my business?
  • Is there a real estate strategy that is true passive income?

I’m still finding the answers to these questions so this year, I will be reading/listening to more books about real estate and determining what my next focus will be.

Ending The 2022 MS Tax Lien Auction On A High Note

For the past 2 years, I had 2 goals when it comes to winning tax lien auction bids.

  • Win at least 3 bids per year
  • Don’t lose money

Starting this year, those goals have changed.

  • I am now 2Xing my winning bids. This means instead of winning 3, I’m winning 6 bids per year.
    • The long term goal is to try to get one tax lien redeemed check in the mail every month.
  • Don’t lose money.
    • By this I mean, I will be sticking with my plan to not bid more than a specific percentage of dollar amount so that I set the company up to make money.

During my research, this year, I put a lot of focus on properties where the owners didn’t live in the county or state.

I WON 6 BIDS THIS YEAR!

The properties include land in an existing developed sub-division and single family homes. I stayed within the range of not bidding more than 15% and I hope it pays off.

Applying Tax Lien Lessons from 2020 towards the Upcoming 2022 MS Tax Lien Auction

August 29th is currently the scheduled date for the MS Tax Lien fall auctions.  I purchased three last year and I have only received funds from one of them so far.  I talk about buying tax liens in my ebook Trials and Tribulations of a Rookie Real Estate Investor.

I’m going to breakdown how much money I actually earned on the one I received recently.

MS Tax Lien Redeemed
  • The delinquent amount on the property was listed at  $319.38.
  • I overbid $25.00 which means I paid $344.38.
  • The owner had accrued $57.49 in interest.
  • I received a check for $376.87 less than a year later.
  • $376.87 –  $344.38 = 32.49. 
  • I made a profit on one tax lien of $32.49. 
  • That is a little over 9% interest I earned.

YOU CANNOT GET A RETURN LIKE THAT WITH A REGULAR SAVINGS ACCOUNT!

This year I have a better strategy.  I wrote a 9 step checklist for myself to follow starting from reviewing my past purchased tax liens to placing pre-bids. It’s a similar checklist I have written about in previous blog posts. The checklist is in a specific order because there are things I have to do before pre-bidding starts.  In 2020, I lost money and I wrote about in Another Tax Lien Redeemed and A Lesson Learned blog post.

In order to avoid this moving forward, I will stick to bidding  15% or less.

Where Is My Mailbox Money??

I refer to mailbox money as money that I receive in the mail from my tax lien investments. It’s a nice surprise to receive money after investing especially if I’ve kinda forgotten about it.

However, due to everything going on today, I’m wondering what’s going on. This time last year, I had received checks for two of the three tax liens I had purchased and I haven’t received any from the ones I purchased last year.

As I listen to the news, podcasts and read FB posts from other real estate investors, I’m wondering if it’s gotten so bad that people cannot afford to pay their property taxes. Will that mean, that tax lien investors will get opportunities to obtain properties at an even lower price than buying them from the MLS or by doing seller financing deals???

I honestly don’t know!

I buy tax liens for the returns they provide because 10 % is far better than the .01% that a bank savings account gives you.

Plus, bidding is not hard once you set your criteria and stick to it. It just takes a little due diligence.